March for Science Organization Promotes Science Advocacy

March for Science Organization Promotes Science Advocacy

On Saturday, April 22, thousands of people participated in the March for Science. This was “the first step of a global movement to defend the vital role science plays in our health, safety, economies, and governments” (1). The march was organized by co-chairs Valorie Aquino, Jonathan Berman, and Caroline Weinberg, and was inspired by the monumental Women’s March on Washington held in January (2). The central march took place in Washington D.C.; however, 610 satellite marches were organized on every continent except Antarctica in support.

The organizers uphold their support of well-funded and publicly communicated science, as a foundation for human freedom and prosperity. The march embodied their mission to “...unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers to enact evidence based policies in the public interest” (1). They expound the following principles: science that serves the public good, evidence-based policy and regulations in the public interest, cutting-edge science education, diversity and inclusion in STEM, open, honest science and inclusive public outreach, and funding for scientific research (1).

The Washington D.C. march was co-hosted by science communicator Derek Muller and musician Questlove and featured over 50 speakers, including creator and host of “Talk Nerdy,” Cara Santa Maria and Bill Nye, CEO of The Planetary Society and host of “Bill Nye Saves the World” (1). The activism of the march will continue with a Week of Action, which includes daily actions, as well as programs and events for people to engage in science advocacy. The Week of Action includes information on leading teach-ins, petitions and pledges to sign, and resources to learn more about scientific facts, individuals, and organizations (1).

The March for Science organization aims to achieve the following goals: humanize science, partner with the public, advocate for open, inclusive, and accessible science, support scientists, and affirm science as a democratic value (1). It is their hope that this past weekend’s celebration of science will inspire citizens to work together to achieve these goals.

Sources

1)"March for Science." March for Science. Accessed April 22, 2017. https://www.marchforscience.com/.

2) Davis, Wynne. "Saturday's March Aims To Stand Up For Science." NPR. April 22, 2017. Accessed April 22, 2017. http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/04/22/525112932/saturdays-march-aims-to-stand-up-for-science.

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